Violin Online: Stuck or Loose Violin Pegs

Having trouble with stuck or too loose violin pegs? Learn possible solutions below.

How to Fix Stuck or Loose Violin Pegs

  1. Humidity or temperature changes can sometimes cause wood pegs to stick or to have difficulty turning. If you experience this, you may want to try an inexpensive product called peg compound (also called “peg dope”). Peg compound will not only lubricate the peg, but it will also provide enough friction so the peg will not slip. When using peg compound or any other product to help with sticking or loose pegs, use it sparingly because a residue can build up over time (some violinists avoid these products).
  2. To apply peg compound, remove the string from the peg, and slide the peg out of the pegbox. Apply a small amount of peg compound to the part of the peg that contacts the pegbox and reinsert the peg. Turn the peg a few times to make sure it turns smoothly. Wipe off any excess peg compound before restringing the peg.
  3. If your pegs are too loose and keep slipping, try pushing the peg in securely while turning the peg firmly. If this doesn’t work, some violinists use either peg compound or another product called peg drops to stop pegs from slipping (peg drops, also known as peg grip are used solely for slipping pegs).
  4. To apply peg drops, remove the string from the peg, slide the peg out of the pegbox, and apply one or two drops to the part of the peg that contacts the pegbox. Reinsert the peg and try turning it to make sure the peg sticks before restringing the peg.
  5. If you need a temporary quick fix for slipping or tight pegs, some violin teachers use these tips: for sticking pegs, pull the peg partially out, and rub pencil graphite on the sticking part of the peg. For loose pegs, pull the peg partially out, and rub birthday candle wax on the peg to help it stick (some teachers use chalk or rosin to help pegs stick, but these substances can be abrasive).
  6. Using too much force with stuck or swollen pegs can cause the pegs or peg box to crack. If you’re still having problems with your pegs, you may need to take your violin to a violin maker or instrument repair person to reshape or replace the pegs.

For additional violin and bow care information, visit Violin Instrument Care